College senior's tweet dedicated to her immigrant farm worker parents goes viral

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Anna Ocegueda, who will graduate from college on Sunday, poses with her migrant parents. (Photo: Twitter)Anna Ocegueda, who will graduate from college on Sunday, poses with her migrant parents. (Photo: Twitter)
Anna Ocegueda, who will graduate from college on Sunday, poses with her migrant parents. (Photo: Twitter)

For more than 25 years, Anna Ocegueda’s parents, who are immigrants from Mexico, have worked picking seasonal fruits in Orange Grove, Calif. This weekend, the senior at the University of California, Merced, will become the first person in her family to graduate from a four-year university.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Ocegueda, 22, shared a photo on&nbsp;Twitter, standing in between her parents with a caption written in Spanish that reads, "Por Ustedes y Para Ustedes," translating to "because of you and for you." Now, the image, originally taken as part of an assignment for a global arts studies class, according to&nbsp;NBC News, has gone viral.” data-reactid=”23″>Ocegueda, 22, shared a photo on Twitter, standing in between her parents with a caption written in Spanish that reads, “Por Ustedes y Para Ustedes,” translating to “because of you and for you.” Now, the image, originally taken as part of an assignment for a global arts studies class, according to NBC News, has gone viral.

The assignment was to portray a political issue through art, and the contrast of Ocegueda’s graduation garb next to her parents’ typical work attire has spoken to many on social media.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""I think it touched home for a lot of people." Ocegueda, one of five siblings, told&nbsp;The University of California, Merced’s Newsroom. "They felt moved by it."” data-reactid=”27″>”I think it touched home for a lot of people.” Ocegueda, one of five siblings, told The University of California, Merced’s Newsroom. “They felt moved by it.”

The student told NBC that knowing her parents were “working in the hot sun kept me going and doing it for them.” She will accept her bachelor’s degree in psychology and a minor in Spanish this weekend. After graduation, she plans to head to the Bay Area to work with children.

Ocegueda has received many messages of congratulations.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""So proud of you and your family, and your shining example of the American dream in action. Wishing you and your family many blessings, success and good health! Congratulations!" a great-granddaughter of Mexican immigrants&nbsp;wrote.” data-reactid=”30″>”So proud of you and your family, and your shining example of the American dream in action. Wishing you and your family many blessings, success and good health! Congratulations!” a great-granddaughter of Mexican immigrants wrote.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""I just want to tell you I'm very proud of you I don't know you but this is the American dream [for] a lot of our parents,"&nbsp;one person tweeted.” data-reactid=”31″>”I just want to tell you I’m very proud of you I don’t know you but this is the American dream [for] a lot of our parents,” one person tweeted.

To others who have messaged her, stating they faced similar obstacles, she says, “You can make it. I’m living proof of that.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read more from Yahoo Lifestyle:” data-reactid=”33″>Read more from Yahoo Lifestyle: