Russia Has Low Expectations Ahead of Trump-Putin G20 Meeting

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    <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Dimitri Alexander Simes” data-reactid=”22″>Dimitri Alexander Simes

    <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Security, Eurasia” data-reactid=”23″>Security, Eurasia

    For the past several years, the Special Counsel’s investigation into whether Trump campaign colluded with Russia has cast a large shadow over U.S.-Russian relations. Now that the Mueller report has found no evidence of conspiracy or coordination between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin, could U.S-Russian relations be headed for a reset?

    Russia Has Low Expectations Ahead of Trump-Putin G20 Meeting

    On Friday, President Donald Trump and Russian president Vladimir Putin will meet on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Osaka—the first summit between the two leaders since the release of the Mueller report in April.

    <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="For the past several years, the Special Counsel’s investigation into whether Trump campaign colluded with Russia has cast a large shadow over U.S.-Russian relations. Now that the Mueller report has found no evidence of conspiracy or coordination between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin, could U.S-Russian relations be headed for a reset? The National Interest spoke with several prominent Russian analysts to gauge Moscow’s expectations for the meeting and how it views the current state of U.S.-Russian relations.” data-reactid=”27″>For the past several years, the Special Counsel’s investigation into whether Trump campaign colluded with Russia has cast a large shadow over U.S.-Russian relations. Now that the Mueller report has found no evidence of conspiracy or coordination between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin, could U.S-Russian relations be headed for a reset? The National Interest spoke with several prominent Russian analysts to gauge Moscow’s expectations for the meeting and how it views the current state of U.S.-Russian relations.

    Many of Trump’s critics in Washington lambast the forty-fifth president as being overly friendly towards Russia. However, in Moscow there is clear disappointment about the Trump administration’s Russia policy thus far.

    <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Ivan Timofeev, program director at the Russian International Affairs Council, told the National Interest, “If we look at the essence of the documents, Trump’s executive orders, his policies over the past three years, then he does not differ from bipartisan consensus on Russia.” He argued that when it comes to instituting sanctions against Russia, Trump often does more than even Congress requires of him.” data-reactid=”29″>Ivan Timofeev, program director at the Russian International Affairs Council, told the National Interest, “If we look at the essence of the documents, Trump’s executive orders, his policies over the past three years, then he does not differ from bipartisan consensus on Russia.” He argued that when it comes to instituting sanctions against Russia, Trump often does more than even Congress requires of him.

    There is little hope in Moscow for a breakthrough in U.S.-Russian relations anytime soon. Although Trump touted the Mueller report as a total vindication of himself, the Russian analysts I spoke with view Trump as remaining quite politically vulnerable.

    “Democrats still do not regard Trump as the legitimate president of the United States,” said Dmitry Suslov, deputy director at the Center for Comprehensive European and International Studies at the Higher School of Economics.

    <p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Read the full article. ” data-reactid=”32″>Read the full article.